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Brian Schiff’s Blog

Injury Prevention, Sports Rehab & Performance Training Expert

It is no secret that elbow injuries have been on the rise in MLB as well as all levels of baseball.  I see far too many adolescent baseball pitchers in my clinic with medial elbow pain.  Often it is related to pathological GIRD and proximal imbalances in the shoulder complex.

Researchers have been studying biomechanics for years.  It has long been a belief that younger pitchers should focus on fastballs and change-ups, while minimizing curveballs. Currently, the prevailing thought and latest evidence seems to suggest that velocity may be the bigger risk factor or determining factor in leading to UCL injuries.

stephen-strasburg

A paper in the August 2016 edition of the American Journal of Sports Medicine from Rush University Medical Center sought to determine factors associated UCLR among MLB pitchers.  The hypothesis was that those pitchers who underwent UCLR would have a higher pre injury pitch velocity.

This retrospective case controlled study looked at data for pitch velocity, type and number for every pitcher and game were gathered from the PitchFx database from April 2, 2007 to April 15, 2015.  Data from 2013 - 2015 was excluded to avoid lead in time bias, as pitches in these seasons may contribute to injuries in pitchers who have not yet undergone UCLR. Pitchers were classified as control, pre injury or postoperative.


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It is time to clear out some product inventory this year.  To that end, I am offering a 50% off sale for one week only.  This sale is on all physical products as well as e-books.  I am also offering this discount on my printed version of the Ultimate Rotator Cuff Training Guide, of which I only have five remaining copies.

Simply enter code BFIT50 at checkout to save 50% on your entire order.  Click Here to view all products.

This sale will end Monday July 18, so act now while supplies last.

Improving lateral chain strength is always a priority when training or rehabbing athletes. Improving anti-rotation stability is particularly important for injury prevention and dissipation of forces in the transverse plane. Whether working with a post-op ACL client or training an overhead athlete, I am always seeking ways to increase torso/pillar stability to increase efficiency of movement and reduce injury risk.

This video below from my Functionally Fit series for PFP Magazine will demonstrate a great exercise do accomplish these training goals.

Emphasis should always be placed on maintaining alignment. Do not progress the load too quickly, and be cautious if using the fully extended down arm position if clients have a history of shoulder instability or active shoulder pathology as this places more stress on the glenohumeral joint. Below are some progressions and regressions as well:

Regressions

1. Decrease the hold time as needed to maintain form and alignment
2. Allow the kettlebell to rest against the right dorsal wrist/forearm
3. Stack the top foot in front of the other foot as opposed to stacking them on top of one another to increase stability
4. Bend the knees to 90 degrees to reduce the body’s lever arm

Progressions

1. Increase the weight of the kettlebell and/or increase hold time
2. Lift the top leg away from the down leg
3. Add light perturbations to the top arm during the exercise to disrupt balance and challenge stability
4. Perform the exercise with the down arm fully extended

Many people suffer from chronic hamstring pain. The question is what is the root source the pain? As a seasoned clinician, I see many patients who present with pain in the upper hamstring/ischial region. Referral sources can include the low back, hip, SI joint, proximal hamstrings, gluteals, piriformis, and ischial bursitis to name a few. In some cases, the pain can be multi-factorial as I see some runners with low level discogenic (nerve) pain and proximal hamstring tendinopathy.  The sciatic nerve and its proximity with the hamstrings necessitates thoroughly vetting the symptoms and its pattern in each client.  Assessing SLR, slump test, reflexes, myotomes and dermatomes is a must.

Determining what the exact source of can be difficult and requires a good subjective exam and objective testing. For the purposes of this particular post, I am focusing on the proximal hamstrings themselves as the primary source of the pain, as I see so many who struggle with proximal tendinopathy who have seen many providers with little relief.

I treat many runners and middle aged adults who experience this high hamstring or buttock pain that is often worse with:

  • Sitting
  • Forward bending
  • Walking or running uphill

As with traditional hamstring strains, eccentric strengthening is a must for this population.  However, we must consider the myofascial component and contributions to this pain as well.  In many cases, these patients have ischial tuberosity tenderness. Consider the referral pattern of the medial HS illustrated below:

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I typically like to consider using hip and core strengthening, dry needling, IASTM, stretching and eccentric strengthening to address the pain.  If I feel the problem may include a sciatic nerve component and there is an extension bias, I will utilize some PA glides and extension exercises too.  In addressing this pain pattern, we must be thorough.

A 2014 case study published in JOSPT looked at a case study with two runners (71 and 69 y/o men) who were treated with eccentric exercises, trigger point dry needling and lumbopelvic stability exercises.  The rehab was phase based and the results are as follows:

Patient 1 was treated in physical therapy for 9 visits over 8 weeks. At discharge, he had achieved his goal of running 8 to 10 km 5 times each week pain free. An e-mail received 6 months following discharge noted that he had remained symptom free with all activity and that he completed a triathlon symptom free.

Patient 2 was seen in physical therapy for 8 visits over the course of 10 weeks and discharge were performed by the same therapist who performed the initial evaluations and oversaw each treatment.  He was discharged after running 30 km without symptoms and reporting significant decrease in hamstring pain. The patient was seen 6 months later in physical therapy for unrelated right shoulder subacromial impingement but reported no hamstring symptoms and that he had participated pain free in a marathon.

In my practice, I have found dry needling, heat and soft tissue work to be very helpful along with stretching and strengthening.  I like to use eccentric PREs and hip stability work to resolve proximal hamstring pain. Specifically, I have used the following two exercises with very good results:

Single leg RDL

Supine reverse hamstring curls using gliding discs

Both of these exercises are effective in promoting eccentric hamstring strength, hip stability, and improved hamstring mobility. Furthermore, they can be effectively used in rehab, rehab and training situations. I routinely use them in all of the above. For a more detailed explanation of the reverse curls, be sure to check out my upcoming Functionally Fit column at www.fit-pro.com.

Keep in mind that hamstring pain can be caused by one or multiple sources. It is best to seek a medical evaluation to determine the exact source of pain and address it safely and effectively. Exercises such as the ones demonstrated in this post represent a few options for addressing hamstring strains/tendinopathy. Others may include Nordic hamstring curls, prone eccentric hamstring curls and hamstring walkouts. Using manual interventions along with exercise is often effective in accelerating and optimizing full recovery.

Reference

Jayaseelan DJ, Moats N, Ricardo C. Rehabilitation of Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy Utilizing Eccentric Training, Lumbopelvic Stabilization, and Trigger Point Dry Needling: 2 Case Reports. J Orhtop Sports Phys Ther 2014 (44)3:198-205.

Well, it has been too long since my last post.  Between seeing patients and the onset of spring sports with my kids, I have not been writing as much as I would like.  I hope to get back to posting at least twice per month very soon.  In the meantime, I thought I would share two recent videos I did for PFP Magazine.  They include a half kneeling torso rotation and supine torso anti-rotation using the Surge.  Both are great ways to improve rotary stability.