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Brian Schiff’s Blog

Injury Prevention, Sports Rehab & Performance Training Expert

Archive for 'running'

Knee pain is prevalent among adolescents and active adults. Patellofemoral pain and osteoarthritis are the most likely causes of pain. It may be present with squatting, lunging, prolonged sitting, kneeling, running, jumping or twisting.

Research seems to support a combination of hip and knee strengthening as a primary line of defense and treatment for knee pain. Interestingly, males with PFP do not seem to have weakness in the gluteus medusa like their female counterparts. The link below is an abstract that speaks to this difference between the two groups:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30090674

Other modalities used to address anterior knee pain include patellar bracing/taping, blood flow restriction training, dry needling/acupuncture and soft tissue work seems to bring more questions accordion to some experts.

Click here to read the 2018 Consensus statement on exercise therapy and physical interventions (orthoses, taping and manual therapy) to treat patellofemoral pain from the 5th International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat.

Clinically, I have seen good results with the following:

1. Activity modification
2. Glute and quadriceps strengthening
3. Blood flow restriction (BFR) training
4. Sequential and progressive loading based on pain response


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In the majority of patients I see with knee pain or knee dysfunction, I uncover gluteal weakness and poor proximal muscular stability. This can cascade into overpronation, vagus collapse, poor balance, and any number of kinetic chain issues. While this may  not be a big deal for sedentary individuals, it becomes a very big deal for athletes and those performing repetitive loading.

When searching for the best exercises to selectively strengthen the gluteal muscles, it is always wise to see what science has to say. More is not always better. I am all for efficiency and finding the most effective exercises in activating the glute over the tensor fascia lata (TFL). In this post, I am sharing a good exercise to do just that. Prior research has indicated that sidestepping and clamshells are very effective in doing just this. Click here to read a prior post on this.

The video below will walk you through his to do the running man exercise.

 

Click here to read my PFP column on this exercise.

Today through the end of Memorial Day I am offering 50% off my entire product line of e-books and DVDs on my website. So if you or your friends and colleagues are looking for information on rotator cuff pain, frozen shoulder treatment, ACL prevention, or programs to eliminate knee pain in runners or those with osteoarthritis, now is the time to grab one of my guides.

Visit http://www.brianschiff.com/Products.asp to see my catalog of products and simply enter the code BFIT50 in the coupon box at checkout. The sale will end Monday at midnight.

It is time to clear out some product inventory this year.  To that end, I am offering a 50% off sale for one week only.  This sale is on all physical products as well as e-books.  I am also offering this discount on my printed version of the Ultimate Rotator Cuff Training Guide, of which I only have five remaining copies.

Simply enter code BFIT50 at checkout to save 50% on your entire order.  Click Here to view all products.

This sale will end Monday July 18, so act now while supplies last.

I work with lots of runners, both recreational and competitive, who are seeking to improve performance or overcome injuries. The most common issues I see are iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) and patellofemoral knee pain (PFP).  With every runner, I routinely perform FMS and video analysis to get a better understanding of their movement patterns, gait mechanics and asymmetries.

living-running-300

Without question, they tend to ask me if there is a better way to run.  Obviously, every accomplished runner has his/her own opinion on the matter.  Some prefer forefoot or midfoot strike, while other do just fine with a heel strike pattern.  In essence, we do not have any sound research or biomechanical evidence to declare one a winner.  Since I work with many injured runners, I am always seeking to find the most efficient ways to reduce injury risk and eliminate pain.

A paper just published in the September 2015 American Journal of Sports Medicine by Boyer and Derrick sought to answer the question of how shortening the stride length or altering foot strike pattern may impact certain variables.  Specifically, the authors sought to compare step width, free moment, ITB strain and strain rate, and select lower extremity frontal and transverse plane kinematics when stride length was shortened 5% and 10% in habitual rearfoot and habitual mid-/forefoot runners using both strike patterns while shod.


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