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Brian Schiff’s Blog

Injury Prevention, Sports Rehab & Performance Training Expert

Archive for 'hip'

In many cases, my clients are unable to perform traditional strengthening exercises for the lower body due to anterior knee pain or weakness. Beyond loading, using the time under tension principle is a great way to add strength for those who cannot squat, lunge, etc. Below are two great videos of isometric ‘go-to’ exercises that will help improve strength and functional capacity in those who are otherwise limited in their workouts.

I hope you can use these exercises or some variation of them to increase strength and overcome injury and dysfunction.

Improving rotational strength and stability in the torso, shoulders and hips is important for injury prevention and performance. The ability to resist and control rotational loads can reduce stress on the body during transverse plane activities and deceleration during sport. This exercise will demonstrate how to train rotational stability in an unstable manner using water with the Aktiv AQUA Bag. The video below is my latest online column for PFP Magazine.

The water provides an unstable training environment that is effective for beginners and advanced users. You can read the entire online column by clicking here.

 

One of the great things about being a columnist for PFP Magazine is that I often get to test out the latest fitness equipment on the market. While there are certainly some very gimmicky things out there, I have some ‘go to’ selections in my toolbox, such as the BOSU®NexGen™Pro Balance Trainer. It is the latest version of this training tool.

In my clinic, I rehab lots of athletes suffering from gluteus medius weakness, poor pillar stability and decreased hip stability. Many of my clientele are working to make it back from ACL reconstruction. One of my preferred strengthening exercises to target the shoulder, torso and hips is split squats. Once the client masters proper form on the ground, I move to an unstable setting using the BOSU®.

It is essential to challenge athletes to avoid valgus collapse. The BOSU® introduces instability at the ankle forcing the body to adapt during the split squat movement. Avoiding dynamic valgus and trunk dominance during training will help with injury reduction efforts for the client.

In the video below I produced for my PFP online column, you will see how to use this exercise effectively to improve strength, stability and proprioception.

 

Click here to read the entire online column.

Bridging is a fundamental exercise to promote hamstring and glute strength. In addition to hip strength, I look for opportunities to enhance anti-rotation/pelvic stability with many bridging progressions due to the weakness and asymmetries I see in my clinic. It will also facilitate hip dissociation.

The stability ball provides an element of instability that can further challenge hip and pillar stability. This exercise is big bang for your buck exercise that can be used in rehab and training circles. Check out the video below that is part of my ‘Functionally Fit’ column for PFP Magazine.

Click here to read the entire column.

 

One of the biggest challenges for clients overcoming knee injuries and surgery is regaining their quadriceps strength and fighting atrophy. This is increasingly so for my clientele on crutches for any extended period of time. It is paramount to use modalities early on in the rehab process such as electrical stimulation and blood flow restriction training to combat atrophy and loss of strength.

Once appropriate, I always move to single limb training to eliminate imbalance and asymmetry. While pistol squats are one of the most effective single leg quadriceps exercises, not all clients can perform this movement. So, in many cases I opt to use a single leg box squat (see video below).

For more information on specific progressions and regressions, click here to read my entire online column. Keep in mind that you should never force through any painful range of motion as this likely indicates excessive strain on the patellofemoral joint.