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Brian Schiff’s Blog

Injury Prevention, Sports Rehab & Performance Training Expert

Archive for 'injury prevention'

It has been a month since my last blog post. Things continue to improve. I would say I have recovered about 85% of my ROM to date. There is still some stiffness reaching behind my back, and I lack about 10-15 degrees of horizontal external rotation and elevation. Overall, my strength continues to improve, and I no longer have a shrug sign when I lift the arm up.

Pain

I am pain free the majority of the time. However, I have learned that overdoing it (trimming my bushes or pushing the weight with rows or simple horizontal presses in the gym) will remind me I am still not 100%. The shoulder will get sore if seated with pressure on the elbow for extended periods of time. However, the best part is sleeping pain free – the whole reason I had the surgery to begin with.

Work

I am having no issues working with my patients. I have realized that lifting my arm up against gravity with any resistance (e.g. stretching a client’s left hamstring) can be challenging if I have to hold the arm up for any extended period of time.

Exercise 

I continue to do my pulley and ROM exercises daily. Meanwhile, a colleague stretches me 1-2x/week. I am doing scapular and rotator cuff exercises 3x/week, while I try to hit the gym at least 2x/week. I am sticking to exercises with my arms by my side for the most part. I have done some light pull downs and very gentle horizontal pressing. Admittedly, I am also being very cautious given the partial tearing on the right side.

What’s Next?

I have my final MD follow-up on 10/22. I am confident that my repair is healing as expected, yet also acutely aware I still have a long way to go before I am back to “normal.” I fully expect it to take a year before the shoulder no longer feels as if it is stiff, sore or weak at any given time.

As for the right shoulder, I plan to modify my lifting regimen and avoid risky exercises and activities. At some point in the next 2-3 years, I will explore having a subacromial decompression to remove the bone spur in the right shoulder and hopefully avoid a full repair.

Closing Thoughts

For those reading and hoping to avoid shoulder surgery, practice good posture, perform routine rotator cuff strengthening and be willing to adjust your exercises as you age to reduce strain on the cuff. This type of injury is more common in men, but overuse and repetitive motion can impact us all.

If you are experiencing ongoing pain at night and.or pain along the outer arm, I would advise you to seek further evaluation from a therapist or MD. If you have a bone spur like me, the situation is likely to worsen over time. If you treat it early, you may be able to avoid surgery altogether or just have the body decompression done, which leads to a faster and less painful recovery.

As I write this update, I have now been back to work for a month. The first 3 days back were challenging, as I had not done that much with my arm in quite some time. I was sore by 5 pm each day, but no significant pain. The soreness resolved by the next morning. I quickly realized how weak I was as I attempted to stretch a client’s hamstring lifting the right leg up with my left arm.

With that said, going back to work also facilitated me moving the arm more frequently and using it against gravity. This has allowed me to regain more functional mobility and strength the past month. I have been careful to avoid any heavy or overhead lifting. I have not encountered something I could not do yet in patient care, but I have had to be aware of my body mechanics and positioning to reduce strain on the left arm.

MD follow-up

I saw the doctor this past Friday. He was pleased with my progress and encouraged me to keep working on regaining the last portion of my ROM. I will go back for one final appointment in 6 weeks. Of note, I had previously asked him to image the right shoulder to see if I had a tear since I have been having some right shoulder pain that has worsened since the left shoulder surgery. The MRI revealed a partial tear (30-40% of mostly bursal-sided fibers), some degeneration in the anterior labrum, biceps inflammation and a sizable bone spur. In essence, the doctor says I need to have the bone spur taken out in the near future to avoid a full tear on my right side. Not great news, but I am relieved it was not fully torn.

Rehab and Exercise

I am continuing to get stretched 2x/week, while doing my pulley and ROM exercises daily at home. I am performing scapular and rotator cuff strengthening about 3x/week. I returned to the gym for the first time on Labor Day. This was a humbling day to be sure as I cannot even do 50% of my previous weight with pull downs, rows and other lifts. But, Rome was not built in a day, and I know it will likely take up to a year to get back to 100% again.


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The idea behind this exercise is applying progressive gradients of resistance that encourage the faulty motion (pulling the leg into adduction and internal rotation) to facilitate increased activation of the gluteus medius/minimus and small lateral rotators to create an anti-adduction/internal rotation force by forcing the brain to work against the unwanted motion (better central nervous system activation). Decreasing such moments at the knee will reduce IT Band issues, patellofemoral pain, ACL injury risk and overuse problems often seen in running.

The video below from my online column for PFP magazine demonstrates how to execute this exercise. It is a great corrective and prehab training activity.

At times, athletes I work with have shoulder or low back pain that is related to restrictions in the thoracic spine. Rotational sports rely upon adequate mobility in the thoracic spine to ensure proper force transmission throughout the body’s kinetic chain. This exercise featured in one of my recent PFP online columns is a nice corrective exercise or mobility drill that can be used to optimize t-spine mobility and resolve any asymmetries.

Keep in mind that forcing through pain or stiffness is not advisable. This exercise can be done daily or as part of the warm-up routine.

As 2020 draws to a close and no holiday travel due to COVID, I found myself spending extra time scanning Twitter, IG and some various blogs related to training and rehab last week. I remember starting my blog many years ago prior to the birth of Twitter and IG (I am feeling old typing that lol). My purpose with this blog has always been to freely share information with clients, the general public and practitioners.

Now, more than ever, there is a plethora of opinions, videos, posts and methods on multiple platforms out there on the web. Many people seek clicks, followers, validation, attention, ad revenue or internet fame. It becomes easy to quickly go down a rabbit hole and become consumed with back and forth convos, online debates about the best exercise techniques/methodology, sales pitches for training programs, and in general what I deem to be excessive or over the top ‘look at me’ promotional posts by certain people. On one hand, the internet is a gift that gives us all a bigger platform and voice, including me. On the other hand, it can also muddy the water, create division among the ranks, and propagate consumer confusion as to what is best for him/her in rehab and training circles.

The spirit and purpose of this year-end blog post is one of a cautionary tale for consumers and young professionals. As someone more seasoned with 24 years of experience rehabbing and training clients, I feel it is important to step back and remember a few important things in this era of instant gratification and access to countless online videos, programs and opinions just a few clicks away.


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