This post is dedicated to improving mobility in two areas I commonly find restrictions in among my clients - the ankle and thoracic spine. Specifically, I often find limitations in dorsiflexion and thoracic spine rotation that create undue stress on other parts of the kinetic chain.

ankle-wall-mob-2

Standing wall touch

Recently, I wrote an article for the WeckMethod site on how to assess and improve ankle mobility.  As a clinician and coach, I see this issue in many runners and athletes I work with.  At times, it is joint restriction, while in other cases it is soft tissue limitations that impact mobility.

There are several potential reasons why one might possess less than optimal movement in the ankle.  The most common causes include: joint stiffness following injury and/or immobilization, soft tissue tightness in the gastroc/soleus complex, scar tissue from a prior injury, anterior ankle impingement, chronic ankle instability and adaptive shortening of the Achilles tendon.  Want to read more?

Click here to read my article on the WeckMethod site

Decreased mobility in the thoracic spine often creates dysfunction and stress on other parts of the kinetic chain, namely the shoulder and lumbar spine.  In many cases, clients will demonstrate asymmetry based on their sport, activity level and injury history.  In light of this, I often prescribe a simple, yet effective corrective exercise they can do at home to restore motion.  The exercise below is taken from my ‘Functionally Fit’ column I recently did for PFP Magazine.

Side lying t-spine roll

Side lying t-spine roll

In the full online column, I reveal two ways to do this and the applications for it.  This exercise also offers a way to assess your own range of motion, while teaching you a straightforward corrective exercise to improve mobility.

Click here to see the video of the side lying t-spine roll