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Brian Schiff’s Blog

Injury Prevention, Sports Rehab & Performance Training Expert

Tag: lateral chain strengthening

Weakness in the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius is often cited in contributing to patellofemoral pain, hip pathology and even back pain. Lateral bridges (planks) have been shown to be effective ways to strengthen the gluteus medium and maximus. This particular exercise focuses on an isometric pillar bridge, while introducing a dynamic movement for the top leg. I like this for athletes, runners and patients struggling with poor hip and single limb stability.

Click here to read my full column in PFP Magazine.

Improving lateral chain strength is always a priority when training or rehabbing athletes. Improving anti-rotation stability is particularly important for injury prevention and dissipation of forces in the transverse plane. Whether working with a post-op ACL client or training an overhead athlete, I am always seeking ways to increase torso/pillar stability to increase efficiency of movement and reduce injury risk.

This video below from my Functionally Fit series for PFP Magazine will demonstrate a great exercise do accomplish these training goals.

Emphasis should always be placed on maintaining alignment. Do not progress the load too quickly, and be cautious if using the fully extended down arm position if clients have a history of shoulder instability or active shoulder pathology as this places more stress on the glenohumeral joint. Below are some progressions and regressions as well:

Regressions

1. Decrease the hold time as needed to maintain form and alignment
2. Allow the kettlebell to rest against the right dorsal wrist/forearm
3. Stack the top foot in front of the other foot as opposed to stacking them on top of one another to increase stability
4. Bend the knees to 90 degrees to reduce the body’s lever arm

Progressions

1. Increase the weight of the kettlebell and/or increase hold time
2. Lift the top leg away from the down leg
3. Add light perturbations to the top arm during the exercise to disrupt balance and challenge stability
4. Perform the exercise with the down arm fully extended